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Sunday, February 05, 2006

Malaysia is touted as "one of the most respectful countries in Asia which practises sustainable forest management"



Malaysia is touted as "one of the most respectful countries in Asia which practises sustainable forest management" when it comes to the international timber trade.
Among the many timber exporters found on the Internet is Simpoh Wood Industries based in Terengganu.
Species such as Balau, Merbau, Kapur and Keruing Apitong are the most popular ones.
"In addition, Simpoh also introduces other species of tropical hard wood, such as Kekatong, Keranji, Acasia, and other Malaysian hard woods.
Chengal is listed among the 10 types of "Heavy Hardwoods" in their website,

General Description: Sapwood is well defined. When freshly sawn;
colour, weathering ultimately to a dark tan brown.
Wood is moderately lustrous and has prominent ripple marks. The grain is interlocked giving rise to stripe figure: texture is moderately fine and even. Resin canals with white contents occur characteristically in concentric lines on end surface but the wood is not resinous.

Principal Uses: Chengal used to be the standard timber for heavy construction, bridges, railway sleepers, sawn power line posts, boat building, heavy flooring, motor lorryand truck body work, rubber coagulating tanks and many other uses where great strength and durability
are required.

It should make good beer vats, dyeing vats, wine casks, tubs, butter churns, etc.
However, the timber is in short supply and is uneconomical for many uses. Balau, Giam and Resak are good substitutes for Chengal.

Veneering : Has not been tried.

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