Sunday, February 12, 2006

the leaning clock tower of Teluk Intan

the leaning clock tower of Teluk Intan at Perak Ipoh

somebody used to live here..

somebody used to live here..
somebody used to live here..,
originally uploaded by Im.H.
this is the ruined of William Kellies first house. it was build on 1909/1910 and it was modellled from the Sultan Abdul Samad Building the 'castle' was build as an extension to this house.

This Building located at Perak

old ruins

old ruins
old ruins,
originally uploaded by Im.H.
Kellie's Castle
Batu Gajah, Perak, Malaysia

Kellie's Castle

Kellie's Castle
Kellie's Castle,
originally uploaded by Im.H.
Kellie's Castle

the old stairs lead to the garden...

Located at perak

Kellie's Castle

Kellie's Castle
Kellie's Castle,
originally uploaded by Im.H.

Kellie's Castle
Batu Gajah, Perak, Malaysia

Kellie's Castle

Kellie's Castle
Kellie's Castle,
originally uploaded by Im.H.
Kellie's Castle Located in Perak

According to the story, William Kellie Smith, the owner, wanted to build the tower high enough until he can see the town of Ipoh. if this tower was ever completed, it would probably be 7 storeys high.

Friday, February 10, 2006

One of the world's biggest Thaipusam celebrations

One of the world's biggest Thaipusam celebrations, amazingly, isn't in india, but in Malaysia. Come to the Batu Caves Temple during Thaipusam, and you'll withness 1.2 million people rejoicing. The celebrations start in Kuala Lumpur's Chinatown where the magnificent chariot of Lord Muruga emerges from the Sri Maha Mariamman Temple and travels in a colourful procession 13 kilometres to the Batu Caves Temple. Throught the procession, you will see entranced devotees carrying kavadis with hooks and skewers impaling their bodies, tongues and cheeks in thanksgiving to Lord Muruga. There will also be thousands of drummers, chanting pilgrims, even volunteers who will offer you free vegetarian food and drinks. Uniformed officers and first aid personnel will be there to ensure your safety. Upon reaching the towering limestone cliffs and the world's tallest statue of Lord Muruga, devotees go up a 272-step staircase into massive caves. The most extraordinary thing? They feel absolutely no pain.

Sunday, February 05, 2006

Malaysia is touted as "one of the most respectful countries in Asia which practises sustainable forest management"



Malaysia is touted as "one of the most respectful countries in Asia which practises sustainable forest management" when it comes to the international timber trade.
Among the many timber exporters found on the Internet is Simpoh Wood Industries based in Terengganu.
Species such as Balau, Merbau, Kapur and Keruing Apitong are the most popular ones.
"In addition, Simpoh also introduces other species of tropical hard wood, such as Kekatong, Keranji, Acasia, and other Malaysian hard woods.
Chengal is listed among the 10 types of "Heavy Hardwoods" in their website,

General Description: Sapwood is well defined. When freshly sawn;
colour, weathering ultimately to a dark tan brown.
Wood is moderately lustrous and has prominent ripple marks. The grain is interlocked giving rise to stripe figure: texture is moderately fine and even. Resin canals with white contents occur characteristically in concentric lines on end surface but the wood is not resinous.

Principal Uses: Chengal used to be the standard timber for heavy construction, bridges, railway sleepers, sawn power line posts, boat building, heavy flooring, motor lorryand truck body work, rubber coagulating tanks and many other uses where great strength and durability
are required.

It should make good beer vats, dyeing vats, wine casks, tubs, butter churns, etc.
However, the timber is in short supply and is uneconomical for many uses. Balau, Giam and Resak are good substitutes for Chengal.

Veneering : Has not been tried.

10 Bald Man in Cheras Kajang

There has been widespread public indination over the action by kajang police to shave bald 10 senoir citizens caught playing mahjong on the second day of the Chinese New Year

Saturday, February 04, 2006

Kepong Viaduct MRR2 Now Close


The Middle Ring Road 2 (MRR2) viaduct in Kepong, which was found to have cracks, will be closed for repair works from 10.30am today. It will be closed for about three to four months.

It will be closed for repair, waterproofing and reinforced steel strengthening works

The repair work would begin on Tuesday. The MRR2 viaduct at Kepong, stretching 1.7 km, was previously closed from Aug 8 until November last year.

The repair works include steel bracing as recommended by the engineering consultants
to the ministry.

We will also install rectangular steel braces to support the pillars for the viaduct

At present, only four of the six lanes are open to traffic as the other two lanes are closed for repairs.